#MustRead: Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist Manny García insights …

Friends, Clients, and Colleagues, Happy Weekend … we hope this note finds you well. Just in time for your weekend reading pleasure — below you’ll find Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist Manny García’s insights into the world of investigative journalism. Manny García is the standards editor for the USA TODAY Network and one of my dearest friends (don’t hold that against him, lol). You will remember, before being named the East Region Executive Editor for the USA TODAY Network — Manny spent 23 years as a reporter and editor at The Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald, covering many of South Florida’s most high-profile stories. He served on two Pulitzer Prize-winning teams, investigating voter fraud in a 1997 Miami city election and documenting the 2000 raid that resulted in Elián González reuniting with his Cuban father. During Manny’s tenure as editor of El Nuevo Herald, the newspaper was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2010 for its coverage of the Haiti earthquake, the first such recognition for a Spanish-language media outlet. Without further introduction here you go — _____________________________________________________________ Writing wrongs: Our investigative journalists do mission work The USA TODAY Network’s reporters strive to provide accurate information that exposes corruption and enables readers to improve their lives. Imagine if your daughter has been wrongfully convicted of murder, and no one cares. Your wife died during childbirth, and the experts now blame her medical condition. Or your dad, a decorated military veteran, is rotting in a nursing home, and the owners pay you lip service — because your dad is really a monthly paycheck to them. These are the stories that our journalists quietly expose. Journalism is mission work, an honest cause beyond our eyes. Like nursing, teaching and police work, it’s built on a foundation of accuracy, trust, wisdom and character, not a billy club. I’ve been a witness to the miracle of journalism for 28 years, and I am honored to be the next standards editor for the USA TODAY Network. I follow a dear friend, Brent Jones, now at The Wall Street Journal. I’ll use this space to share with you honestly, transparently, the good we do, as well as when we fall short. Let me tell you who I am and where I’m from First, let me tell you about me. I live the American Dream. My family fled communist Cuba in the early 1960s. They lost the only life they knew. My family rarely talked about...
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County leaders united to ensure citizens’ full access to justice…

Florida’s Constitution promises that “The courts shall be open to every person for redress of any injury.” We hope this brief note finds you well. Today, we reflect and rejoice in the great news — County leaders are united to ensure citizens’ full access to justice by authorizing a competitive process to construct a new civil and probate courthouse to replace the beloved but rapidly deteriorating Dade County Courthouse a/k/a “Cielito Lindo“. On Tuesday, County commissioners unanimously endorsed a new competitive procurement process to select a private-public (P3) development team to “design-build-operate-maintain-finance” a new civil county courthouse — next to the existing courthouse, on Flagler Street. ________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ For your convenience, here is link to the latest Miami Herald article by Douglas Hanks detailing these developments on the construction of a “new” courthouse. ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ It has truly been an honor and privilege for Pablo Acosta, Esq. and I to serve as pro bono governmental affairs counsel to Chief Judge Bertila Soto of the 11th Judicial Circuit of Florida. Chief Judge Soto has fought tirelessly to ensure that the County to take every step to guarantee an open, transparent and competitive procurement process — in order to ensure that a cost-effective, functional new civil courthouse is constructed — promptly. As Chief Judge Soto explained in a recent Viewpoint in the Miami Herald — “A courthouse is essential to our democracy and is an essential public service.” ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Please join us in thanking Mayor Carlos Gimenez, Chairman Steve Bovo, Committe Chairwoman Sally Heyman and the entire Board of County Commissioners for their unwavering support for ensuring all citizens full access to justice. This is a very significant milestone for all the residents of our community and will be OUR legacy for generations to come. We fight on, inspired by the immortal words of President George Washington —  “The administration of justice is the firmest pillar of government.” Amen. As always, thank you for your friendship and continued support. Warmest regards, Jorge Luis Lopez, Esq. Governmental Affairs...
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Breaking News: ”American Cancer Society Outlines Blueprint for Cancer Control in the 21st Century”

“An assessment of progress in cancer control” On behalf of our colleagues and fellow volunteers and supproters with the American Cancer Society and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, we are excited to share with you with this breaking news — “American Cancer Society Outlines Blueprint for Cancer Control in the 21st Century”. Please join Marile and me in recognizing and thanking — Rebecca L. Siegel MPH, Ahmedin Jemal DVM, PhD, Richard C. Wender MD, Ted Gansler MD, MPH, MBA, Jiemin Ma PhD, and Otis W. Brawley MD — for their brilliant work, dedication and commitment to the fight against cancer. “The first article, published on Tuesday, July 10, summarizes progress in cancer control by reviewing trends in cancer mortality and disparities in cancer outcomes. The report highlights mortality trends for several cancers that demonstrate successes and challenges in cancer control, and describes gaps in cancer mortality by race/ethnicity, economic and educational level, and region of residence.” Below please find charts and links for your review — feel free to click thru for more details. _____________________________________________________________ Mortality Trends Figure 1: Trends in Age‐Standardized Cancer Death Rates Among Males and Females in the United States, 1930 to 2015. Rates are age adjusted to the 2000 US standard population and are presented per 100,000 person‐years. Data source: National Center for Health Statistics. “An assessment of progress in cancer control” _____________________________________________________________ Disparities in Cancer Outcomes Figure 2: Cancer Mortality by Race/Ethnicity From 1990 to 2015. Rates are per 100,000 and age adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Rates for American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) are based on the Contract Health Service Delivery Area (CHSDA) counties. Rates for Non‐Hispanic white, Non‐Hispanic black, and Hispanic exclude deaths from Louisiana, New Hampshire, and Oklahoma. Data source: National Center for Health Statistics. “An assessment of progress in cancer control” _____________________________________________________________ Geographic Disparities Figure 4 – Decline in Breast Cancer Mortality Rate From 1988–90 to 2013–15 by State. Data source: National Center for Health Statistics. “An assessment of progress in cancer control” _____________________________________________________________ “Upcoming articles – which will be published over the next several months – will focus on prevention, screening and early detection, survivorship, and cancer care and treatment. It is our hope that these articles will be viewed and adopted as a guide for how to gain control of cancer and cancer mortality reduction, and achieve a national mortality reduction goal for the year 2035.” Please help us spread this breaking news by sharing with your friends...
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Fourth Annual Diamond Society Appreciation Dinner and Recognition Ceremony

The Miami Children’s Health Foundation will be hosting one of its signature events, the Fourth Annual Diamond Society Appreciation Dinner and Recognition Ceremony, on Thursday, May 12th — Where the Foundation will pay tribute to the members of the Diamond Society for their generosity, and philanthropic support for Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. What is unique about the Members of the Diamond Society, is their diverse portfolio, which include: community and business leaders; philanthropists; grateful patients, parents, and grandparents; physicians. However, they all share a common passion for Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. With the Diamond Society’s gracious donations, the foundation can achieve its goal of ensuring that children everywhere receive the highest quality of medical attention. Thanks to the support of these donors, children are treated by first- class physicians, nurses, as well as the top-notch technology available.Thereby, establishing Nicklaus Children’s Hospital is a leading pediatric healthcare institution. Miami Children’s Health Foundation Board Chair, Marile and Jorge Luis Lopez, will be attending this year’s Ceremony. Marile Lopez works directly with the the not-for-profit organization where she facilitates the strategic planning of the foundation’s policies, while also securing their financial support. Even though Mrs. Lopez enjoys working closely with the Miami Children’s Health Foundation, this will be her last dinner as Chair. “It has been enriching working alongside Lucy Morillo… It has been inspiring working for the betterment of the patients of Niklaus Children’s Hospital… It has been rewarding to see our community come together for this one cause–the health and wellbeing of the future—our children.” – Mrs. Marile Lopez. The Ceremony will take place at 7:00pm on Thursday, May 12th at the Coral Ga bles Country...
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Leave A Legacy: Donor Next Door Luncheon Honoring Mrs. Marile Lopez and Mr. Jorge Luis Lopez

     Leave A Legacy Foundation is a nonprofit organization that collectively organizes a group of professionals, and other not-for-profit institutions, who share the same ambition of promoting philanthropy work in Miami- Dade County, by inspiring members of the general public to create a legacy through charitable givings. Leave A Legacy delivers this message by hosting the Donor Next Door Luncheon, which is a multi-year public awareness campaign that gives not-for-profit organizations the opportunity to honor their most dedicated philanthropists for their influence to the community. The campaign was established to showcase the generosity of individuals, families, foundations and corporations who donate their time, talents, and treasures to support the work of nonprofits in the arts, education and social services among others. This year, Leave A Legacy will be honoring local donors whose philanthropy has supported the efforts of over 34 South Florida nonprofit organizations at the, 19th Annual Donor Next Door Luncheon. During the Donor Next Door Luncheon, the not-for-profit organizations will be honoring their most dedicated philanthropists for their dedication to the community. The Miami Children’s Health Foundation has been acknowledged, and will be honoring Mrs. Marile Lopez and Mr. Jorge Luis Lopez — who serve on numerous boards of charitable and not-for-profit organizations — for their exceptional work for the Miami Children’s Health Foundation. Mrs. Marile Lopez is presently the Chair of the Miami Children’s Health (MCH) Foundation, where she assists in formulating strategic policies and plans, and secures financial support for the not-for-profit organization. In 2013, Mr. and Mrs. Jorge Luis Lopez Chaired the MCH Diamond Ball for a second consecutive year, following the Diamond Ball’s remarkable achievements in 2012, where they raised $4.3 million dollars. Mrs. Lopez also served on Miami Children’s Health Foundation’s 2011 Diamond Ball Committee. Mr. and Mrs. Lopez will be honored at this year’s Leave A Legacy, Donor Next Door Luncheon, which will take place at 11:45am on Thursday, May 12th at Parrot Jungle Island, 1111 Parrot Jungle Trail in Miami,...
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